Who's going?

Adult Bikes
Kid bikes
Tandem Bikes

Use anytime within 6 months

Use anytime within 6 months

Teach Your Kid to Ride a Bike on Central Park Bikes

Have you planned a trip to New York City with your children? Then bring them to Central Park and teach them how to ride a bike! Central Park is the perfect place to spend the afternoon in New York City. You can take advantage of Central Park bikes to have a productive afternoon.

 

Riding a bike is easy. But when you use Central Park bikes, you will need to make sure you teach your children the basics of bike riding so you can all have a safe and pleasant ride. As you start to teach your kids to ride a bike, make sure you explain the following to them.

Safety Measures

It’s important that your children know the safety measures when they learn to ride a bike. First of all, make sure to remind them to always look both ways when crossing at an intersection or when making a turn. Not only will that ensure their safety, but it will also gear their bike in the direction they want to turn. When turning, it is important that they always know how to slow down. This will allow them to make their turn sharp and precise and not take up the entire road when turning. That could compromise their safety.

Brakes

When you use the Central Park bikes to teach your kids how to ride a bike, you need to emphasize the importance of braking. It is necessary to use both breaks simultaneously, especially when you need to break suddenly. The best tip is to gradually add pressure to the brakes in the moments before braking so the bike slows down naturally on its own.

Gears

When you use Central Park bikes to teach your kids how to ride a bike, making them understand the gears of the bike might be the biggest challenge. The front gears can be found near the right pedals, and they need are used to make the biggest shifts. To make pedaling easier or to increase your speed, it is better to use the back gears. Those can be found near the rear wheels. Both gears can be controlled by shifting mechanisms that can be found on the left side next to your hand.